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Revealed – How the Bank of Mum & Dad use Equity Release to Fund 1st Time Buyers

Saturday, July 5th, 2014

Bank of Mum & Dad

 

It has recently come to my attention, having watched my own daughter attempt to buy her 1st property, how difficult it has become for 1st time buyers to fulfil their dreams of becoming a homeowner.

 

It also occurred to me that EQUITY RELEASE could in fact play a significant role in assisting the “Bank of Mum and Dad” and others in providing funds to enable these dreams to come true.

 

First some FACTS:

  • The average age for 1st time buyers is now 29
  • 2/3rds of 1st time buyers now turn to the Bank of Mum and Dad (BoMAD) for help
  • 30 years ago 12% of income was needed for a deposit on a property. Today this is staggering 82%!
  • The cost of an average house in the UK is 10 times bigger than the average salary rising to 14 times in London
  • In all but 2 regions in the UK, prices are 7 or more times the average salary for that area (Office of National Statistics)
  • More than 3.3 million 20-34 year olds were still living with their parents in 2013

 

Although these figures clearly indicate it is becoming almost impossible for 1st time buyers to get on the property ladder, help could be at hand – YES, from the “Bank of Mum and Dad”

 

Parents are an obvious first point of call. However with rising living costs, low interest rates and diminishing savings pots, it has become increasingly more difficult for mum and dad to find surplus funds to gift to their children, grandchildren or loved ones, to assist in fulfilling the dream of property ownership.

 

However, there could be a way to take an early inheritance from parents now in order to benefit 1st time buyers when the money is needed the most!

 

A special type of retirement mortgage commonly known as Equity Release could potentially unlock cash tied up in a parent’s property. This can enable mum & dad to generate sufficient funds to gift as a deposit on a property purchase for their loved ones.

 

What is equity release?

Equity release schemes are available in two formats – home reversion & the more popular lifetime mortgage. Both of these equity release schemes enable people who own their main residence to release a percentage of its value in return for a tax-free cash lump sum. These two types of equity release mortgages then run for the rest of your life & only repaid once upon death or moving into long term care.

 

The equity release scheme known as a lifetime mortgage has proven the most popular due to its flexibility. This has been strengthened this year with providers such as Hodge Lifetime & Aviva both providing an option to repay upto 10% of the original capital borrowed each year. Therefore, control over its final balance, or even repayment of the whole scheme over the longer term could represent a serious possibility, for either parents to pay, or the children themselves!

 

Lifetime mortgages are available to those aged 55+, with a minimum property value of £60,000. The amount that can be borrowed is not always based on affordability, but on factors such as age & property value. Effectively, the older you are, the greater amount of equity you can release.

 

Following a release of the equity, the lifetime mortgage company places a first legal charge on the property. This is exactly the same as any conventional mortgage and 100% legal ownership is still retained by the client providing peace of mind.

 

Typically, someone age 60 could release equity of between 18-25.5% of the value of the property, dependent on the lender concerned. These equity release funds can be spent on anything you like, however a sensible & cautious approach is always advised. Therefore, parents looking to assist their children onto the property ladder, a lifetime mortgage could prove an effective mortgage vehicle to achieve this goal.

 

Which equity release schemes can help 1st time buyers?

Equity release schemes have become a lot more flexible and innovative these days. You can choose to make NO repayments and have the interest added to the loan which is known as a roll-up lifetime mortgage. The amount borrowed plus any interest accrued is repaid upon sale of the property. This would happen on death (last death if joint plan) or having to go into long term permanent care. Thought must be given here should there be more than one beneficiary. With an increasing balance & possibly reducing net equity figure, consideration must be afforded to any remaining beneficiaries as to what they may potentially receive at the end of the day?

 

However, there are new repayment versions of equity release schemes that have proven even more popular with parents looking to securely gift money to their children to help with a property purchase.

 

Interest only lifetime mortgages from Stonehaven & more2life will allow the repayment of just the interest only element. By repaying interest charged each month prevents the loan from increasing and thus remains level for the rest of the mortgagor’s life. This is a great idea when there is more than one child involved. The problem has always been how to separate the gift now, from the overall inheritance at the end of the day if more than one child is involved?

 

The solution is having an interest only lifetime mortgage. By knowing in advance what the balance will be, this loan amount can be deducted from that child’s share of the inheritance at the end of the day. This would be even fairer for the other siblings, should that child also pay the monthly premiums on behalf of the Bank of Mum & Dad!

 

NEW -Voluntary partial repayment plans

Equity Release Supermarket now has access to specialist equity release schemes where there is the option to repay up to 10% of the original capital released each year without any early repayment charges. These equity release schemes through Aviva & Hodge Lifetime have proved popular for those not just looking to repay the interest, but also the opportunity to repay the equity release scheme in full over approximately 16-17 years. These voluntary partial repayment equity release schemes are proving to be the next generation of the equity release market.

 

How is the Bank of Mum & Dad protected?

All the equity release schemes we recommend are members of the Equity Release Council, which means that there are certain guarantees built into them for consumer protection. As a minimum the Equity Release Council will ensure the following guarantees are included:-

  • The schemes are portable and can be transferred to another qualifying property should you wish to move in the future
  • There is a no-negative equity guarantee which means a debt cannot be left to your estate even if the value of the property becomes less than the balance of the loan outstanding
  • You can live in your house for as long as you wish and with a lifetime mortgage you retain full ownership
  • They can be repaid at any time, subject to potential early repayment charges

 

Benefits of using Equity Release

Contrary to directly gifting your property to your children, by using equity release to gift instead, would avoid any Capital Gains Tax as the main residence is retained by the client. There could still be a potential Inheritance Tax liability, but only if the client died within 7 years of the gift.

 

The lifetime mortgage would be a deductible liability against the client’s estate, reducing the value being taxed and although interest would have to be paid on the loan; this could still prove beneficial to both the client and those receiving the gift. Always consult a tax expert on these matters in conjunction with your independent equity release adviser.

 

Of course let’s not forget the best part of this!

 

The potential to fulfil the dreams of our loved ones in an age where quite frankly, property purchase is almost becoming nothing more than just a dream for some. The joys of parenthood!

 

Next Steps…

I would be delighted to offer a FREE initial consultation to discuss any of the above matters relating to how equity release can help your children step onto the property ladder.

 

Please call me on 07788 605620 or 0203 7517228 or email cathy@equityreleasesupermarket.co.uk

Now Aviva Accept Voluntary Repayments – Does this Change the Future of Equity Release?

Tuesday, May 27th, 2014

Aviva equity release voluntary partial repaymentsAviva equity release plans have proved the most popular form of lifetime mortgage scheme over the past 15 years.

The reason for their popularity has been down to a combination of brand name, simplicity and the fact that Aviva have regularly provided the lowest equity release interest rates.

 

However, during that time there has been a cloud hanging over their lifestyle flexi mortgage range and that is the issue over the maximum early repayment charge & the lack of a partial repayment facility. It’s always been a case of all, or nothing with regards to paying off Aviva’s equity release schemes – now we have a choice.

 

Aviva – time for change

In the past few weeks Aviva have bravely taken steps to alleviate these issues with some bold amendments to their lifetime mortgage range. In fact the impact these changes could make, will dramatically alter the way equity release schemes will be used & managed in the future. Other equity release companies will undoubtedly take note of these new features & it can only signal the start of further innovation in lifetime mortgage industry.

 

Aviva have introduced three new approaches to equity release: –

  • new voluntary repayment features can be used to actually clear the equity release loan over a set number of years
  • Aviva apply a different approach to enhanced equity release rates by actually reducing the interest rate on offer (see later article)
  • An early repayment charge exemption can be applied on first death for any new joint equity release lifetime mortgage (see later article)

 

Why Aviva needed to up the ante

Monday 28th April heralded the start of swinging changes to the Aviva Lifestyle Mortgage range. All Aviva’s new equity release applications from this date forth would have the ability for partial repayments to be made back to Aviva.

 

However, from our company perspective during 2013, Equity Release Supermarket had seen its share of applications move significantly towards the Hodge Flexible Lifetime mortgage range. This has been due to Hodge Lifetime’s two pronged attack on becoming the most popular & flexible lifetime mortgage product. Their innovative move towards being able to repay upto 10% of the original capital borrowed & the ability to downsize after 5 years & repay the loan with NO penalty has captured a large market share.

 

Aviva has now responded to the popularity of the Hodge Flexible Lifetime Mortgage plan by matching the 10% repayment option & additionally providing more beneficial features!

A new dawn for the equity release market has started.

 

How does the Aviva Voluntary partial repayment option work in practice?

From inception of the new Aviva equity release plan there is the inherent ability to make repayments of an ad-hoc nature back to Aviva. Aviva do have a cap of 10% of the original capital borrowed that can be repaid in any one year. Additionally, the earliest date that the first repayment can be made is 12 months from the commencement date of the plan. So some forward planning needs to be made & this ideally would have been made with the involvement of your equity release adviser at recommendation stage.

 

Consideration needs to be borne in mind that interest will be added to the plan in the meantime for calculation purposes. For example, if a sum of £40,000 equity was initially released at an interest rate of 5.68%, the balance before any repayment could be made would be £42,272.

 

This is where the first decisions on how much to pay back need to be made, and there are three options available:-

  1. If only a fixed budget is available, then a contribution towards the interest accruing could be made. Should this be less than the annual amount of interest charged, then the balance will still increase, albeit at a lower rate than would otherwise have been should nothing have been repaid.
  2. Should a level future balance be the choice moving forward, the sum of £2,272 could be annually sent back to Aviva, thus reverting the balance back to its original starting point of £40,000. This process could theoretically continue infinitum until the plan ends, which would be upon death of the last borrower or them moving into long term care. The balance would always flicker between these two figures, dependent at what point the repayments of £2,272 were made.
  3. If total repayment of the £40,000 is required, then a repayment strategy could be put in situ which would see this whole amount repaid over a set number of years. Dependent upon how much is initially borrowed & assuming maximum repayments of 10%pa can be maintained for the duration, Equity Release Supermarket can calculate at what point the plan can be fully repaid with NO penalty!

 

As an example Equity Release Supermarket have calculated someone borrowing £40,000, on the popular Aviva interest rate of 5.68%pa, & repaying the maximum £4,000pa could repay their Aviva lifetime mortgage shortly after the end of the 16th year.

Could this be classed as the first capital & interest equity release mortgage?

 

Please contact us on 0800 678 5159 for your personalised Aviva repayment calculation or click this link.

 

How do I physically make voluntary repayments back to Aviva?

A reminder to make repayments will begin with the receipt of your first annual Aviva equity release mortgage statement. This will evidence the amount of interest that has been added to your plan. It is at that point that the first repayment can be made back to Aviva. The question is how much to pay & this will be down to an individual’s personal preferences.

 

Aviva have cleverly side stepped the issue of MMR (Mortgage Market Review) here. Whereas companies such as Stonehaven & more2life have had to adapt their interest only lifetime mortgage process to the new MMR regime, Aviva due to their ad-hoc approach to repayments have avoided the MMR obstacle. Regular payments cannot be set up to repay the Aviva equity release schemes. Although Aviva do permit upto 4 payments each year, subject to a minimum amount of £500, the repayment process has to still be managed through their head office.

 

This repayment process would initially involve a phone call to the Aviva offices advising them of the fact a repayment is due to be sent to them. In reply they will provide a verbal form of quote which acts as confirmation. This can be confirmed in writing to you & optionally your adviser aswell so they are aware of your intentions.

 

The next step would be to send the money which can be in the form of a cheque, credit or debit card or a bank transfer for which Aviva will provide their details & reference number to track. They will not accept payments without this process having been accomplished, or contact being made beforehand. In fact they could return the funds should this process was not followed.

 

Important repayment points to note

As previously stated, repayments can only commence after 12 months from inception of the loan. However, Aviva have imposed further 12 month conditions on when repayments can be made following certain events: –

 

  1. Following withdrawal of cash funds from the drawdown facility of the flexible lifetime mortgage
  2. Should any additional borrowing be taken in the future

 

In both situations, no repayments can therefore be made for 12 months following these two events also.

 

Additionally, the same applies in reverse;

Should a customer have made repayments and has an available cash reserve under their drawdown plan, they cannot gain access to the reserve or additional borrowing until 12 months following their last repayment has been made.

Aviva may consider requests for a further release of equity in exceptional circumstances outside of that rule.

 

These rules are effectively to prevent to the to-ing & fro-ing of cash funds within the plan which would undoubtedly have made the Aviva equity release plans unmanageable and unprofitable.

 

Functional planning ideas for managing voluntary repayments & retaining a cash reserve

Although it’s still early days in the life of the new flexible repayment options, some ideas on managing the Aviva voluntary repayments have already sprung to mind.

 

Unlike Hodge Lifetime, Aviva do not impose a £10,000 lower capital threshold by which no further repayments can be made without penalty. In fact Aviva will allow the continued repayment of interest & capital with NO minimum amount down to zero, or even almost zero.

 

This could be beneficial for those who want to see the equity release balance to be reduced to a minimum level (e.g. £100 or less), yet still maintain the option of keeping their drawdown lifetime mortgage cash facility for the future. Bear in mind the small outstanding balance will accrue interest (albeit minimal), yet for many the comfort of retaining a cash reserve may have massive benefits should cash be required still in the future.

 

Summary

Aviva have responded well to the changing needs of the baby boomer generation as equity release moves into the next stage of its development. Retiree’s financial needs are becoming more complex with almost 75% of pensioners owning their own property, even carrying debt into retirement & living much longer than previous.

 

Aviva’s latest changes will therefore appeal to both advisers and consumers alike who are looking for more flexible loan terms on the long road ahead.

 

To request an Aviva Flexible Lifetime mortgage quote with voluntary repayments please click here.

Click the following link for your FREE Aviva capital repayment calculation.

 

To discuss any of the points raised in this article please contact Mark on 0800 783 9652 or email mark@equityreleasesupermarket.co.uk

 

Practical Applications of the Pure Retirement Drawdown Plan

Saturday, March 22nd, 2014

Pure Retirement Drawdown PlanPure Retirement recently became the latest equity release provider to enter the lifetime mortgage market.  Launched in January 2014, it signalled the re-emerging confidence & growing popularity in the equity release market.

 

However, it makes no sense for a new lender to enter the market without finding a niche for itself. So, over the past few months Equity Release Supermarket advisers have encountered practical experience of where the Pure Drawdown Plan has fitted in providing best advice scenarios. Here we help explain where we feel the Pure Retirement Plan wins, in an already competitive equity release marketplace.

 

First, the Pure Drawdown Plan in Detail

Before we enter the wheres & wherefores of how the Pure Plan fits in with equity release recommendations, let’s look at the Pure Retirement plan facts

 

The Pure Retirement Drawdown Plan is the first offering from the new lender formed by funding assistance from equity release brokerage – Age Partnership. This follows the similar relationship that exists between more2life & Key Retirement Solutions and represents a growing trend where brokers have become equity release providers. This similarity is also evidenced from where the funding source is derived, in that Pure Retirement relies also on the same annuity backed insurer to give it the ability to fund its lending – Partnership Assurance.

 

The Pure Drawdown plan is a lifetime mortgage that starts later in life than most equity release schemes with a minimum age at commencement of 70. It’s aimed towards the higher end of the loan-to-value ratios without any medical underwriting, which the enhanced lifetime mortgage plans have the advantage of.

 

The starting percentage is 36% of the property value at age 70, which compares favourably with other high LTV products. Albeits not the highest maximum equity release plan out there, it has a neat trick up its sleeve with how it can still compete with these maximum lifetime mortgage plans. Details of how are explained later in this article.

 

As a member of the Equity Release Council, the Pure Drawdown Plan offers a free no-negative equity guarantee and 100% ownership of the home. Portability enables you to still move house once the plan has been set in force and the interest rate is fixed for life, launched at a reasonably competitive 6.74% monthly rate (7.1% representative APR).

 

The minimum loan is higher than most at £25,000, which is where Pure Retirement’s market lies and is available in England, Scotland & Wales.

 

This is a roll-up lifetime mortgage plan with the option of a cash reserve facility. Therefore, Pure Retirement will calculate the maximum release possible, from which an initial amount can be withdrawn. Any funds untaken, remain in a cash reserve held by Pure Retirement at no cost until needed in the future. Should it later be necessary to access these funds, they can be drawndown in minimum amounts of £5,000 with no further charges.

 

Where Pure Retirement Lifetime Mortgage Strengths Lie

As an independent equity release adviser, one of the most common reasons for client objection lies in the costs of implementing an equity release scheme. Here is where the Pure Drawdown Plan wins – set up costs!

Only one equity release company has previously offered a scheme whereby the standard terms dictate a cost effective route to market for any client taking out a lifetime mortgage, & that’s Partnership’s Enhanced Lifetime Mortgage. Some lenders will temporarily create pockets of time whereby a cashback exists or a reduced interest rate for a limited period, but these come & go.

 

However, Pure have created these features as a permanent fixture & all credit to them in seeing this gap in the market and understanding what the consumer requires. Afterall, many applicants want a release of equity to help them financially as they have limited funds in the first place. By asking them for more money up front, it makes the process more difficult for them to get the whole application underway. Pure Retirement alleviate these areas, both pre & post application stages, let me explain how and why.

 

Pure’s Set up Costs

Pure Retirement provide a two tier set up cost operation; one for equity release loans between £25,000 & £44,999, the other based on loans in excess of £45,000.

All equity release schemes will normally incur set up fees in four main areas – Valuation, application, solicitor & adviser charges.

 

Pure approach this differently in the sense they aim to cover the majority of costs; the more one borrows, the greater the help provided. For loans over £45,000 the cost is enhanced furthermore by them providing: –

 

  1. FREE valuation
  2. NO application fee
  3. Contribution of £600 towards legal costs
  4. Contribution of £500 towards the advice fee

 

Therefore, dependent upon how much the advice fee being charged is, which in the case of Equity Release Supermarket its £895; the net advice fee cost would only be £395. Bearing in mind we can source an ERSA equity release solicitor, for a reasonable £495 + VAT & disbursements (including home visit) the £600 contribution from Pure Retirement should cover this on a standard freehold property. This effectively means to implement a Pure Drawdown Plan with Equity Release Supermarket would only cost approximately £395!

 

Where Does the Pure Retirement Plan Offer Clients Best Advice?

As previously stated, Pure Retirement Drawdown Plan has been targeted to meet those clients looking towards a maximum equity release in order to assist them with their retirement needs.

A recent example of how the Pure Drawdown Plan can still offer a client a greater net amount, even though the maximum release is lower than a competitor, can be illustrated by a case I recently encountered: –

 

CASE STUDY

Pam, aged 79 was looking to move property & required a lifetime mortgage to help her with the purchase. She was in good health & needed the maximum release possible to not only help with the purchase but also the moving costs & legal fees.

The purchase price for the 3 bedroom flat in Cornwall is £140,000.

 

Pamela requires the maximum release possible which following extensive research would point towards the Just Retirement Lump Sum Plus plan which would release £64,400 at an annual interest rate of 6.75%. This comes with a free valuation, £600 application fee, legal costs & advice fee.

 

Looking further down our research table identifies the Pure Drawdown Plan with a 6.74% monthly interest rate. However, the maximum release Pure would offer would be a lower amount of £63,000. But upon delving deeper into this product & by analysing the charging structure it shows that the actual Pure Retirement net release could be higher.

 

Fee Type /Provider

Valuation

Application

Legals

Advice

Legal Contribution

Advice Contribution

Net Costs

       Just         Retirement

FREE

£600

£600

£895

£0

£0

£2095

Pure Retirement

FREE

£0

£600

£895

£600

£500

£395

 

Evidently, the Pure Retirement plan has £1700 reduced set up costs, compared to the Just Retirement plan. The next part of this calculation is then offsetting this £1700 advantage that Pure Retirement has against the £1400 extra that Just Retirement can release as their maximum.

 

The final result therefore shows that Pure Retirement will have a greater net release to Pam of £300 and therefore proceeds with the recommendation as the £300 would be more advantageous in her pocket.

The message therefore is never look at the top line maximum amount, but always to consider any incentives that may help improve the net offering.

 

Existing Equity Release Customers Looking for Additional Funds

Other areas where Equity Release Supermarket customers have already benefitted from the new Pure Retirement lifetime mortgage is under two scenarios: –

 

  1. Where they have an existing equity release plan & need further funds.
  2. If looking to obtain a lower interest rate, yet no lender can provide sufficient funds to enable the equity release remortgage

 

Following the routine check to see if any additional borrowings are available with their existing lender, it’s then our duty to research the whole of the market to see if any other equity release providers could assist.

 

One of the issues against switching equity release schemes is usually the set up costs that prohibit the transfer. Under the two scenarios, in the first the charges could swallow up any of the spare cash being targeted, and in the 2nd scenario the set up costs make any transfer non-profitable as these costs offset any future savings in interest.

 

Its therefore the case that set up costs can prevent future maneuverability with any home equity scheme.

 

This is where the Pure Retirement Drawdown Plan can come into its own with its lower set up costs. Under both scenarios, Pure’s reduced set up costs will help with the switching of equity release schemes. Under the 1st scenario it will lead to more funds being available to withdraw & secondly in obtaining a lower interest rate its helps bring forward the break-even point.

 

Summary

Set up costs are an important aspect in the consideration of accepting any equity release recommendation. However, your adviser should consider the whole picture and features necessary in your meeting your requirements. This is why any equity release adviser should be experienced, qualified and importantly independent too.

 

If you feel that the Pure Drawdown Plan could be of benefit to you, please contact Mark Gregory on 0800 783 9652 or email mark@equityreleasesupermarket.co.uk.

 

 

Further Information

 Request Pure Drawdown Quote | Pure Product Specs | How Much Can I Borrow? | Contact Us

Can I Move Home with Equity Release?

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014

Moving Home With Equity ReleaseOne of the most common questions we get asked as equity release advisers is whether a lifetime mortgage is ‘flexible’ enough to meet any future change in circumstances?

 

Having reached retirement, experience has taught us all that life can be full of surprises and quite rightly this question is always high on the agenda.

 

This article has been written using my 10 years equity release experience & how I have helped guide my clients towards their ultimate goals, but at the same time alleviating any inhibitions surrounding equity release and moving home in the future.

 

The most common apprehensions regarding flexibility and moving or buying a new home can be summarised as follows:

  1. Can I move home if I have already taken out an equity release plan?
  2. Can I use equity release to purchase a new property
  3. How much can I raise on a new home using maximum equity release schemes?
  4. Can I transfer my existing equity release scheme to a new home?
  5. Can I still take out equity release if I downsize?
  6. If moving house, is it worthwhile transferring, or taking out a new plan?

 

So how does an equity release adviser dispel the fears and help their clients overcome the concerns that a release of equity mustn’t feel like a noose around their neck?

 

Considerations on Moving Home from an Equity Release Advisers Point of View

When we consider the question of a possible future house move, we can divide this into three very different scenarios; each one deserving separate consideration in its own right: –

  1. The first equity release scenario captures the proposition of using a lifetime mortgage, or home reversion plan to help fund the purchase of a new house
  2. The 2nd situation analyses the advice & legal process required when purchasing or moving home, utilising an existing equity release plan.
  3. Lastly, we explain the advisers perspective on what options are  available to a client with their existing equity release mortgage, upon moving home

 

Scenario 1 – Can I use Equity Release to help fund a house purchase?

An increasing number of enquiries seem to be coming in from people who are looking to move home, and this can be for various reasons. Some are looking to move nearer to their family for support, others are looking to downsize to repay loans and mortgages. Still others simply want to buy that bungalow they had always dreamed of for when they retired.

 

In the majority of cases, the best way to use equity release schemes to help fund a house purchase is to transact them simultaneously. This means involving an equity release application to be used as part of the legal process to buy. Consider this theory as exactly the same principle as using a conventional residential mortgage to help buy a new property.

 

In essence, by taking equity release at the same time as house purchase will save money by not duplicating the legal work, should a release of equity be needed at a later date. The rationale is that only one set of legals are required should equity release & the purchase be transacted simultaneously. However, if a release of equity is taken post purchase, then two set of legal costs are incurred; at the time of the house purchase, but then again later when equity release is done in isolation.

 

The rules are fairly straightforward, whether you use a lifetime mortgage or a home reversion plan for this purpose. A given percentage of the value of the proposed purchase property would be made available, depending on the age of the youngest applicant, and some or this entire figure would be sent to the conveyancer on the day of purchase to enable completion to take place.

 

Case Study:

Mr & Mrs Townley are aged 65 and looking to buy a property nearer to their daughter at a cost of £200,000. Their own home has been sold for £180,000 and, bearing in mind the additional costs involved, they feel they would need a further £30,000 to complete the purchase.

Following research, their lifetime mortgage adviser has recommended the Aviva Lifestyle Flexible Option where they could release upto 25% of the value of their new property. This potentially could provide them with a maximum release of £50,000.

They decided that they only want £30,000 of this for now but, as they don’t know what the future may hold, they ask for a cash reserve facility to be set up so that they could access the other £20,000 in the future, just in case they need it later.

 

Scenario 2 – Can I move home AFTER releasing equity on my home?

This is a different question altogether, but is definitely another one that comes up most of the time. Most people want to know before they enter into an equity release agreement, what would happen if they moved home in the future? This could be downsizing when one partner is left on their own, or moving into sheltered accommodation, if health dictates it becomes necessary.

 

First of all it is important to acknowledge that any lender that is a member of the Equity Release Council (which recently replaced SHIP) will allow the transfer of an equity release plan to a new, suitable property. Portability is an important facet of all equity release schemes.

 

Important considerations for anyone releasing equity include what they think MAY happen, or which is MOST LIKELY, as none of us know what’s around the corner.

 

If downsizing is the most likely outcome, then it should be very easy to find a lender that will allow this with the facility to move the equity release plan at the same time. A valuation would be carried out on the new property and the maximum configured equity release would be calculated. Having access to a lifetime mortgage calculator would be an advantage.

 

If the amount currently owed, is in excess of the maximum amount available for release on the new property, then the excess would need to be repaid from the profit made through selling and buying the cheaper property.

Of course some people want to have the flexibility of repaying the loan in full if they downsize later on and this is where some care is needed from outset to ensure this is possible.

 

As lenders become more attuned to what is important to equity release customers we are seeing some innovative thinking and I for one hope that this is a trend that will continue to grow over the coming years.

 

Scenario 3 – What should I do with an existing equity release if I want to downsize or purchase new?

This scenario is a continuation of the previous section, albeit taking into account in greater detail the options available & what should be done with an old equity release plan. It would be amiss of any adviser to automatically assume it would be in the client’s best interest to port an old lifetime mortgage or home reversion plan to the new property.

 

This is a key opportunity for an overall review of the older plan to establish its competitiveness in today’s equity release environment. From my experience of working at Norwich Union Equity Release (latterly Aviva), I am aware of older legacy equity release plans that in today’s world are outdated and uncompetitive.

 

My Experience of Norwich Union’s Legacy Equity Release Plans

The forerunner of all of Aviva’s equity release plans was called the Capital Access Plan. The Norwich Union Capital Access Plan had an interest rate, not charged against the balance, but calculated against the property value escalating over time. People with these plans who have seen a large increase in property value, will also had seen a proportionate increase in their equity release balance.

 

Another legacy plan which is no longer available is the Norwich Union Index-Linked Cash Release Plan. This a scheme which offered a maximum equity release lump sum from age 55, but with an interest rate linked to Retail Price Index (RPI). This Index Linked Cash Release Plan had a minimum interest rate of 4.89%, rising to a maximum rate of 10.14%. The calculated rate was dependent upon on the annual change in RPI which was then added to the minimum rate of 4.89%. Hence, this scheme did not provide as much certainty as today’s lifetime mortgage fixed rates.

 

From thereon in, Norwich Union or Aviva Lifetime Mortgage schemes had interest rates over 8%pa and potential early repayment charges of 100% of the original balance borrowed. Its schemes such as these that need assessing as to whether they should continue, or if favourable, could be repaid upon sale & a new plan taken upon simultaneous purchase of the new property. With rates today from Aviva as low as 5.68% annual, it could make sound financial sense to consider a new scheme which could save many £1,000’s over time by switching.

 

Free Initial Consultation

It is therefore essential for an experienced independent equity release adviser to undertake a full review of the entire situation & provide an impartial recommendation as to what is best advice moving forward. This will involve requesting an upto redemption statement from the existing lender, analysing the existing scheme & importantly assessing all the features including potential early repayment charges.

 

Equity Release schemes that were taken out some time ago are usually not as competitive, or flexible as plans around today, given the period of low interest rates incumbent over the last 2-3 years.

 

I would advise ANYONE thinking of moving to take advice as it may well be cheaper to change lender than staying with your current one and transferring your plan to the new property. The only way of finding this out is to take advice from an Independent Equity Release Adviser that is able to research the WHOLE of the market. By conducting a switch plans analysis, Equity Release Supermarket can address whether it would be worthwhile, or not, to switch equity release plans when moving home.

 

 

Examples of lenders already attuned to the option of downsizing – Hodge Lifetime

At the moment if anyone is thinking of downsizing in the future and repaying their equity release plan in full, then serious consideration should be given to a new plan such as the Hodge Lifetime Flexible Mortgage Plan.

 

This plan allows the borrower to repay the whole amount WITHOUT PENALTY if they decide to move home & downsize, as long as this is at least 5 years after inception of the plan.

 

Alongside this downsizing protection option is the fact that, if something unforeseen should happen and you need to move and repay during the first 5 years then the Hodge Lifetime penalty for doing so would be capped at 5% of the initial release in year 1, 4% in year 2, 3% in year 3, 2% in year 4 and then 1% in year 5. Significantly, the Hodge Lifetime penalty is more favourable than many of the gilt linked product related early repayment charges.

 

I believe this gives an added degree of flexibility for equity release consumers, and I hope it’s an indication that lenders are changing the way they change tact & begin providing greater flexibility as the need to move home in the future increases.

 

The fact remains that it is possible to move home and it’s imperative that you get the right advice when considering equity release initially AND when thinking of a house move as well.

 

Summary

It is probably one of the most important decisions you will make financially, as the decision you make now will not only impact on your future, but also your children & grandchildren’s future.

 

These are the reasons why we at Equity Release Supermarket always offer a free, no obligation, initial consultation which can be in the comfort of your own home or over the telephone, whichever is preferable.

This initial consultation gives us the chance to ask our clients about their objectives as well as their future plans, so that we can tailor any Equity Release scheme we recommend to each individual set of circumstances.

 

For your FREE, NO OBLIGATION, initial consultation (whether it’s your first time or if you want to review your current scheme) please call Mark on 07966 889597 or e-mail mark@equityreleasesupermarket.co.uk

 

Equity Release Is For Life, Not Just For Christmas

Sunday, November 3rd, 2013

Equity Release is a Lifetime MortgageI recently read an advertisement in a National newspaper extolling the virtues of Equity Release and was surprisingly written on behalf of one of the main equity release brokers based in Preston. All fine I thought until I saw that it was aimed at grandparents struggling to buy Christmas presents for their grandchildren.

 

It created a small furore amongst my colleagues and peers. The blogs were alive with advisers & political commentators slating the fact that equity release was being considered for such short term measures. Not only that, but to take equity release to spend on the grandchildren, would effectively be spending their own inheritance!  With the compounding effect of the interest over the remaining years, this will turn out as one expensive Christmas present.

 

After all, the most popular type of equity release is the lifetime mortgage; appropriately named & for a reason. These schemes are designed for longevity, not short term or for frivolous reasons, where better alternatives may exist.

 

Some were arguing that whatever legal reason people wanted a release of equity for, withdrawing capital was their choice, not ours as advisers, and on the face of it that is correct.

However, when I looked into this scenario further this played on my conscience for personal reasons and I had serious reservations.

 

I have five grand-kids, all under five years old. I had to check with my wife, but on average we spend about £150 to £200 on each. Extravagant ? Maybe. Worth it ? Definitely.

 

With various other gifts for family and friends we spend about £1,500. Agreed not easy on low pension income and little liquid savings.

 

If I was in that position and saw the advertisement I would almost certainly look into the possibility of equity release schemes. I would hope that I would employ the services of an independent equity release adviser i.e. someone like me who would strongly advise not to go down this route.

 

And here are the reasons why:-

  1. The minimum initial lump sum on any equity release scheme is currently £10,000. This would have to equate to £2,000 for this Christmas, £8,000 in the bank for the next 4 Christmases. The cash in the bank may attract 1-3% interest whilst I would be paying up to 6% interest on the mortgage. Not a good idea
  2. The set up fees, depending on the lender, could be as high as £2,000. Acceptable if you are considering a large expense such as buying a new car, a holiday of a lifetime, clearing an mortgage or giving the grand-kids a start in life for house deposit or university fees. Therefore, as a proportion of a £10,000 release, set up costs can be a considerable percentage of the initial release. Not so good to borrow £2,000 for Christmas gifts on this basis.
  3. If, like me, your intended beneficiaries are your grand-kids then they are actually buying their own gifts via their future inheritance. Let’s assume £10,000 on a normal roll-up lifetime mortgage, even on the lowest rate with Aviva Flexi Plan currently at 5.62% (5.8% APR) and deducting the set up costs from this, would in 10 years have accrued to about £17,276. So 10 year’s worth of Christmas gifts has cost £7,276.

 

I applaud the fact that some of the broker companies are bringing Equity Release to the fore and the pros and cons of equity release schemes are highlighted to the general public.

 

As a dedicated Equity Release specialist I am convinced of the merits of raising capital by these means as long as the following measures are taken: –

  • All possible alternatives are discussed with your adviser and broached with the children. Equity release is classed as a loan of last report by ourselves
  • The initial release matches your needs for the first 12 months of your spending plans i.e. don’t take any more than you actually need
  • You receive independent equity release advice from a FCA (Financial Conduct Authority) qualified adviser
  • The schemes recommended are members of the Equity Release Council (ERC) which ensures they come with the equity release code of conduct indoctrinated
  • You receive separate legal representation from that of the lenders. As from 2014, this will need to involve a face-to-face meeting with your solicitor for added protection
  • You receive a Key Facts Illustration and Suitability Report covering all aspects of your adviser’s recommendation including set up costs, interest rate, future balance & early repayment charges.

 

I have personally seen the benefit equity release has made and have the testimonials to show the satisfaction & difference a lifetime mortgage can make to someone’s life.

If taken for the right reasons, under the right circumstances and with the right advice, equity release schemes can prove to be the right choice.

 

If you require further information on whether equity release schemes could be the right choice for you, please contact Barry Adnams on 07989 281108 or email barry@equityreleasesupermarket.co.uk

 

Are you Releasing the Potential from your Retirement Apartment?

Sunday, October 20th, 2013

Releasing equity on a retirement apartmentWith an ever increasing ageing population, more and more retired homeowners find that their properties are becoming too big to live in. In conjunction with this another significant financial burden is the ever increasing energy costs associated with heating larger properties.

 

This could mean that they make a choice whether to ‘eat or heat’.  An old cliché yes, but a very apt and true one.

 

Specialist housing, or retirement apartments have been around for more than 30 years and just 1% of over 60’s are estimated to live in these types of properties.  For most, moving to a retirement property can ease the pressure of excessive bills, plus give a new lease of life and community spirit.

 

For others though, a retirement apartment could be seen as not being financially prudent or comes with some uncertainty for a number of reasons:

  1. Location: Specialist retirement apartments may be more expensive than the value of your own home.
  2. Service charges: These are payable annually, and in line with inflation, they tend to be an increasing sum.
  3. Pension income: May suddenly be reduced upon the demise of an occupier.

If you already live in a retirement apartment, you may have the concern that with increasing costs and service charges, you may not be able to maintain your cost of living, and have the worry of potentially needing to sell.

 

Did you know however, that there could be a solution?

 

As an Equity Release Specialist, I have over the last 12 years been able to provide homeowners with an alternate way of being able to purchase a retirement apartment or to raise funds to cover on-going costs and services if you already reside in one.

 

Firstly, if you are looking to purchase a retirement apartment, by releasing equity, you could raise the shortfall between the sale of your current home and the purchase price of your proposed new property.  The equity release could be raised on your new property and would complete at the same time as your sale and purchase. The equity release application could also be on a roll-up, or even interest only lifetime mortgage basis to fit in with one’s inheritance requirements, or household budget.

 

Secondly, if you are already residing in a retirement apartment, you could have the option of releasing equity to cover your annual service charges.  This could be by way of a lump sum lifetime mortgage which additionally has the option of a cash drawdown facility. This would particularly suit those looking to take annual withdrawals to supplement their income & cover the costs of maintaining residence in their retirement home. The drawdown facilities with many equity release schemes can allow as little as £1000 withdrawals at a time to suit those not wishing to withdraw too much.

 

Case study 1

Mr & Mrs F lived in the West Midlands, but had always dreamed of retiring to the coast and live out their remaining years in the peace and tranquility of a property with a sea view.  Their 3 bedroom house was worth £175,000.00 and they wanted to downsize.  Mr F was not in particularly good health and he wanted to make sure that Mrs F didn’t have the financial worry or burden that their large home would have if he pre-deceased her.  Downsizing though didn’t necessarily mean down-pricing.  The purchase price of their dream apartment by the sea was £200,000.00, meaning a shortfall of £25,000.00 plus the associated moving costs.

By giving Mr & Mrs F full impartial equity release advice and recommendation, I was able to offer them a Lifetime Mortgage lump sum through a specialist interest only lifetime mortgage lender for £35,000.00.  This allowed them to cover both the £25,000.00 shortfall to facilitate the purchase, plus £10,000.00 for moving costs. Overall, this not only assisted with the purchase of their retirement apartment by the sea, but also enabled them to live there in financial comfort.

 

Case study 2

Mrs S was already living in her retirement apartment when there was the untimely demise of her husband.  Now just in receipt of her own pension, Mrs S was concerned that she would not be able to cover the on-going living expenses.

The service charges amounted to £2,704.00 per annum (£52.00 per week) and being on a reduced pension, Mrs S would struggle to maintain her standard of living plus pay her normal household expenses.  Being a specialist in equity release, I was able to advise Mrs S of her options, including a full benefits check.

 

Mrs S was just over the threshold for benefits, therefore I could look at the option of a drawdown lifetime mortgage.  Mrs S released an initial amount of £10,800.00 to cover four years’ service charges, leaving her with a remaining cash reserve of £21,600.00.  The drawdown facility allowed Mrs S to release sufficient funds each year thereafter to pay her service charges on an annual basis.

 

How Equity Release Supermarket can help…

Over the years, I have helped many clients in the same or similar situation and have such pride in doing the job I love and being able to assist purchasers and homeowners alike. Being independent lifetime mortgage advisers Equity Release Supermarket have vast experience in assisting its clients with retirement apartment purchases or releasing equity on them.

 

In addition we have access to the best equity release deals including cashback, free valuations and specially reduced interest rates. We always offer a free initial consultation, to see whether we can assist the over 55’s with retirement mortgages and financial help.

 

If you would like more information on how these equity release plans work, please contact Marcelle on 0800 783 9652. Alternatively, please email mark@equityreleasesupermarket.co.uk

 

The Many (Sometimes Unusual) Reasons to Release Equity from Your Home

Monday, October 14th, 2013

Unusual reasons to release equityDuring my 10 years as a Lifetime Mortgage specialist I have come across a plethora of reasons to make genuine use of equity release schemes. There are the most obvious and popular reasons such as remortgaging and debt repayment; but there are also some that aren’t so obvious.

 

Equity Release Case Study #1

One that springs to mind is a case whereby I helped an individual back in 2007. This was a 74 year old male who lived in South Cheshire. The situation was terribly sad, but not without hope and possible happiness on the horizon.

 

His only child had been his son, who had unfortunately died a few years previous in a car crash. To compound matters further he had sadly lost his wife within the last 6 months of our meeting. Their greatest pleasure when they were together, was to go on cruises around the Mediterranean and Caribbean which they could fund from their regular income.

 

Following on from these unfortunate events, he re-evaluated his retirement plans with a positive outlook. He therefore decided that his life would now be split between 6 months at home and 6 months cruising, and it was now just a case of being able to finance his revised situation.

 

He decided he would like to raise a total of £150,000 by releasing equity after calculating that figure would cover his costs for the next 10 years.

 

I therefore arranged a flexible drawdown lifetime mortgage, with just an initial £15,000 and a large enough cash reserve facility that he could then draw upon, as and when required. This suited him perfectly and for a couple of years at least, I got postcards from around the world. The drawdown lifetime mortgage plan was his ideal plan and met his requirements not only now, but also into the future when further cruises and retirement expenses would be required.

 

That’s what we, at Equity Release Supermarket call an aspirational equity release case. That is one that helps someone to attain their goals in life and we are only too happy to help advise on such cases.

 

The other side of the coin is a needs based equity release case. This is where there is an urgent need to raise equity in order to stave off potential severe financial repercussions such as mortgage repayment, insolvency or even bankruptcy.

 

Equity Release Case Study #2

From my experience, such a case was with a 68 year old lady in North Derbyshire who had accumulated personal loans and credit card debts amounting to over £80,000. The strange part was that these were from gambling regularly on the Canadian Lottery of all things. Her family had contacted us to see if we could help which indeed we could. However, in order not to fall into a similar trap, I advised the family to remove or better still destroy her credit cards.

 

In circumstances like this, equity release schemes can act as an almost immediate relief from stress and worry and several times over the years I have had a letter from the client’s family. This provided me with personal satisfaction as they were thanking me for my considerate actions and telling me how not only does the client feel and look better, but I may have also added another few years to his life expectancy.

 

Being an lifetime mortgage adviser can sometimes transform people’s lives for the better and is one of the many reasons that I feel so passionately about the equity release marketplace I work in.

 

These are just two case studies whereby I have been able to assist retirees with their financial issues in retirement. Have it be known they are two relatively extreme cases, but I use them to show the diversity of reasons for using lifetime mortgages.

 

The reason I have been exclusively involved with equity release schemes for the last 8 or 9 years and intend to stay so until I retire, is because of the instant reaction to either attain the wherewithal to achieve ones goals, or to remove the stress and strains of financial problems in retirement.

 

About the author

Barry Adnams is the author of this article. Barry is one of the most experienced equity release advisers at Equity Release Supermarket, having previously worked as an adviser & manager at NatWest/Royal Bank of Scotland Equity Release.

 

Having worked with RBS Equity Release in 2005, Barry has much experience in dealing with retirees financial situations and is fully aware as to the importance that a release of equity can be. Barry endeavours to meet all his clients face-to-face, if not only for a cup of tea!  Dealing with his many clients this way enables Barry to discuss both the pros and cons of equity release and is always open to family members being present at such meetings.

 

If you wish to discuss anything in relation to Barry’s articles or any general questions about lifetime mortgage or home reversion plans, then please contact Barry Adnams at Equity Release Supermarket, on 07989 281108 for a free initial consultation.

 

Alternatively, Barry can be contacted by email at barry@equityreleasesupermarket.co.uk.

 

To evidence the quality of Barry’s advice & feedback from his clients please check his testimonials on the Feefo link on the homepage (bottom right corner).

 

Who Is Eligible For Equity Release?

Tuesday, August 6th, 2013

Before committing to hours of research & requesting numerous quotes on equity release schemes, first you should establish whether you can even qualify for a lifetime mortgage or home reversion plan.

 

In this article we discuss what lenders are looking for when accepting the over 55’s onto their equity release mortgages.

 

As much as recent press articles have shown, there is a rapidly growing interest in Equity Release.

There are now further signs that this is being taken ever more seriously by policymakers faced with the consequences of an ageing population and increased financial difficulties being encountered by pensioners.

 

Recently a House of Lords committee highlighted the need for property-owning pensioners to unlock wealth in their home rather than try to push costs onto future generations, often including their own children.

The report concluded that ‘It is reasonable to expect those who have benefited from the property boom to support their own longer lives. We suggest that one way to address the current imbalance would be for older people to consider unlocking their house wealth.’

 

So who is eligible for a Roll-Up Equity Release Plan?

Unlike most lending products such as mortgages or personal loans, borrowing on equity release is not determined by your income, but by two main criteria. These are your age and your property.

 

Your age and circumstances

  • You must be aged over 55
  • You must be a homeowner and the property is your main residence
  • You must live in the UK.

 

Your age determines the percentage of the property value a lender will provide for you. For example, at the age of 65 with a property value of £175,000, you could expect a release around 30% of the property value – £52,500.

 

However, In some cases where a client has had a history of poor health, enhanced lifetime mortgage lenders such as Aviva, Partnership, more2life & recently Just Retirement will consider providing a higher amount, subject to further medical information.

 

By asking a series of health questions relating to your medical history, these enhanced equity release providers can judge how much more you could be entitled to depending on the severity of your health.

Therefore in the scenario above, a male aged 65 with a property value of £175,000 could now potentially raise upto 46% of the property value equating to £80,500. A substantially greater amount of £18,000 has been released by just taking advantage of one’s poor health!

 

The property itself

All lenders will insist on a valuation being carried out on the property. This valuation determines whether the lender will provide the funding required. The valuation is based on similar property sales in the area and one that could expect a reasonably quick sale. This is always the ‘unknown’ as property value is subjective, however using sites such as Zoopla may help as a guide, but not the bible!

 

So why is a valuation necessary?

  • The equity release lender needs to know that the property is worth at least £70,000
  • They needs to consider other factors which may include;
    • Construction type. Is the property built of brick with a tiled roof?
    • Is it a house or is it a flat?
    • Is it freehold or leasehold, and if leasehold, how many years are left on the lease?
    • Is it a listed building?
    • Does it have any agricultural ties?
    • Is it next to or above retail premises?
    • More importantly now – Is it in a high flood risk area?
    • Has the property suffered subsidence or been underpinned?

 

*There are cases where one client is under the age of 55 but their partner is over this age, and there are lenders who will consider holiday homes for the source of lending but these require further advice and information

 

Having been advising on equity release schemes since 2008, Equity Release Supermarket are aware of what an important decision taking releasing equity can be. With an old fashioned face-to-face approach our experienced advisers prefer to undertake home visits, where there is the opportunity to openly discuss both the advantages and disadvantages of the variety of products available with prospective clients and their family members .

 

If you want to benefit from the experience Equity Release Supermarket advisers have to offer and understand how equity release works further, then please contact the team, on 0800 678 5159 for a free initial consultation.

Alternatively please email admin@equityreleasesupermarket.co.uk.

 

To see what Equity Release Supermarket’s clients have to say about us check our 100% Feefo testimonials on the Feefo link on the homepage (bottom right corner).

Before Using Equity Release Club Together All Available Savings and Benefits

Thursday, June 27th, 2013

Experience has shown that equity release should always be considered a lifetime mortgage of last resort.

 

With the popularity of equity release schemes reaching an all time high, now is a good time to take stock of just why the equity release market has reached the level of consumer confidence it now commands.

 

There have been many highs & lows for an industry which has been much maligned. However, with increasingly flexible schemes & the lowest interest rates ever seen, we could be in for a ‘golden age’ for equity release.

 

It is therefore essential to seek the services of a qualified professional equity release adviser who is able to club together all their resources and ‘know how’ to complete a full fact find assessment of the clients situation.

 

This will include the ‘hard facts’ such as income, savings & assets etc which determine one’s current financial predicament. However, just as important are the ‘softer facts’ which mould a customer’s future viewpoint such as interest rates, property values and their potential inheritance.

 

Armed with this information, you should find an equity release adviser would assess whether a clients objectives could be met by alternative solutions, prior to an equity release recommendation being made.

 

Equity release alternatives  

When releasing equity from your home it involves a number of risks. Therefore, it is important that before your equity release adviser makes any recommendations, full consideration are given to whether there are any other options that could be explored.

 

Equity Release Supermarket will always discuss the following alternatives as a pre cursor to any equity release recommendation. Typically, these are:

 

  1. Apply for benefits – if your retirement income is below minimum government standards, then you may qualify for means tested benefits. These would include pension credit, savings credit and council tax benefit. For tax year 2013/14 the minimum income level to qualify for is £145.40pw for a single person and £222.05 for a couple. Therefore, if retirement incomes fall below these figures then you should be making enquiries at the DWP and your local authority. Remember that taking equity release from your property can affect means tested benefits, so always get professional advice.
  2. Obtain a grant for home improvements – again, if your income is below government guidelines then there are certain grants that are available upon enquiry. The standard grants can include loft insulation, cavity wall insulation, new boiler and by contacting your local Home Improvement Agency (HIA) they could provide assistance to help repair or even adapt your home. Therefore, these should always be explored before taking a home equity plan.
  3. Downsizing – i.e. moving to a smaller, less expensive property – probably the most common & cost effective solution, rather than taking equity from your property. Sometimes an emotive issue, as most retirees have lived in their current abode for many years, often with many memories attached. However, with the children moving on, your property may become too large to maintain. Therefore, by downsizing to a smaller property you can release equity that can then be used for the purposes you require & support you financially into your retirement.
  4. Using other assets to provide the funding required – taking equity release involves the expense of compound interest & an interest rate charged that would be higher than that received in most investments & savings accounts. Therefore, why take equity release, when you may have considerable savings you could use instead? Nevertheless, bear in mind some investments may be used for income purposes, so need to be left in situ & there should always be an emergency fund on hand should anything untoward occur & funds required immediately. Some people even feel the necessity for a large amount on deposit as they feel more secure knowing these funds are available. As an equity release adviser, we would explain the pros and cons of this course of action and maintain equilibrium for both parties.
  5. Ask for assistance from other family members – Equity Release Supermarket has experience of situations where brothers, sisters or even children have assisted their parents, rather than letting them take a release of equity form their property. This could be achieved by a family member taking a personal loan, remortgaging or even taking funds from their own personal savings. Lending to parents can have its drawbacks too, & we have seen occasions where this has created more family issues than it was meant to solve. However, with formal agreements in place if necessary, this can still be a good equity release alternative.
  6. Reduce your expenditure – with an increase in equity release lending being for debt consolidation purposes, many people have found the income transition from employment to retirement is a struggle. To maintain living standards in retirement, compared to employment is difficult for many & some never come to terms with this loss of income. By not cutting the cloth accordingly, debts amass on credit cards & loans & the downward spiral begins. By planning ahead before retirement & then analysing where cutbacks could occur once retirement starts, can have a significant influence on future retirement finances.
  7. Take in a lodger – one suggestion that always raises a smile, but in theory for many could help bring in extra income. The government ‘rent a room’ scheme allows home owners to let out a furnished room and receive upto £4,250pa in gross receipts without liability to income tax. For many however, sharing their main residence with other people may not sit too comfortably, however for individuals with room to spare it could create a good tax free income. Remember to check with your home insurance company & any lease that may exist on the property to ensure it does not create any exemptions.
  8. Consider other types of loans – credit card, personal loan, mortgage, HP – depending on affordability & the duration of the lump sum required, there are shorter term loan options available than equity release. A personal loan or strict use of a credit card and using some of the 0% credit offers available could prove to be extremely costs effective. The lifetime nature of equity release schemes means that if they are paid off early, there could be considerable early repayment charges levied by the provider.  Beware of high APR’s on loans and credit cards & bear in mind potential rate changes that could occur in the future should interest rates rise again.

 

As you can see before taking equity release club together all the ideas above and assess whether any of the aforementioned financial solutions could help yourself and/or beneficiaries over time. Equity Release Supermarket always suggest speaking to your children in any case to allay issues over inheritance.

 

To discuss how your equity release club of measures could help, contact the Equity Release Supermarket team of advisers on 0800 678 5159 or email mark@equityreleasesupermarket.co.uk

Newlife Rekindle Their Unique Buy-to-Let Equity Release Plan

Thursday, April 25th, 2013

With a timely return to a buoyant buy-to-let mortgage market, newlife (formerly New Life Mortgages) have re-launched their unique ‘Landlord Loan’.

 

Originally released in 2006, the newlife Landlord equity release scheme was withdrawn a number of years ago, coinciding with a general drop in equity release applications & funding.

 

The newlife landlord lifetime mortgage is another welcome addition to the developing equity release sector, which is seeing a resurgence in lending with similar innovative products & lowest ever interest rates.

 

What is the landlord loan?

Effectively, the newlife Landlord Loan is a buy-to-let equity release mortgage. It is designed specifically for the over 55 age group, who are using rental property for investment purposes in order to help boost their retirement income.

 

Being able to release equity from their portfolios, the landlord loan could help finance more buy-to-let projects and also help with capital gains tax mitigation.

 

How does the landlord equity release scheme work?

Based on the principle of the roll-up lifetime mortgage, the buy-to-let equity release scheme helps landlords with rental properties withdraw equity tied up in their portfolios.

 

Normally strict rules apply to equity release schemes as the property concerned must be the main residence. However, newlife have bucked this trend & designed this landlord equity release plan around the rental market and have coincided this release with a 2nd home or holiday home equity release plan.

 

In essence, any UK landlord over the age of 55 with a qualifying buy-to-let property can release a percentage of the property value with NO monthly repayments necessary. There must be no mortgage present on the property; otherwise the existing mortgage will need to be repaid from the proceeds of the landlord loan.

 

The equity release landlord loan attracts a rate of interest at 6.55% (7.1% APR) and is fixed for the lifetime of the mortgage. The interest rolls-up on a monthly basis and is eventually repaid upon death or the last person.

 

The landlord scheme carries all the principles laid down by the Equity Release Council including a no negative equity guarantee, thus protecting the beneficiaries from ever owing more than the property value itself.

 

Qualifying criteria

Applicants must be 55 attained and have a buy-to-let property valuation of at least £150,000. The property must be in England & Wales and let on an Assured Shorthold Tenancy basis. A portfolio of upto 5 properties can be included, with a minimum loan of £25,000 and the maximum being £250,000.

 

How much can I borrow on the landlord loan?

The size of the release is determined by age & property value, therefore income verification is not required. Nevertheless, newlife will require the rental income to at least cover the interest charged in the first month of the term.

 

An example release could be illustrated by considering a male aged 65, with a rental property value of £200,000. The newlife landlord loan would release upto 23% of the property value – a maximum release of £46,000.

The range of LTV’s stretches from 13% at age 55, upto a maximum 42% once age 85 is attained.

 

Benefits for buy-to-let property owners

  • the release of equity is free of tax & can be spent in whatever way you choose
  • landlord equity release helps cash flow in retirement as you continue to receive rental income, but without having to make any monthly repayments
  • Open-ended mortgage with no fixed repayment date
  • Opportunity to restructure your property portfolio to provide additional retirement income
  • The lump sum could be used to settle any outstanding interest only mortgages still running due to failed endowment policies
  • Can be utilised as part of a divorce settlement where the matrimonial home is to be retained by one party
  • Help the funding of long term care by converting the main residence into a buy-to-let which can then provide a tax free lump sum and additional income to pay care costs
  • The opportunity presents itself now to delay the sale of a BTL property, when property prices may still have growth potential in the future
  • The tax free lump sum could be used to purchase an annuity or enhanced annuity which has its own tax advantages and provides additional income in retirement.
  • A fixed interest rate of 6.55% which means the future balance of the buy-to-let lifetime mortgage scheme will be known from the outset
  • Tax advantages arise whereby the property sale can now be postponed if a landlord loan is taken instead. This can then defer, or even avoid potential capital gains tax in the future
  • The landlord equity release plan is portable & can therefore be transferred to a new qualifying  property
  • Further advances can be considered after 3 years, with a minimum top-up of £10,000.

 

If you are a 55+ landlord and looking to release equity from you buy-to-let portfolio, then call Equity Release Supermarket today on 0800 678 5159.

 

*To obtain a quote you can visit our newlife landlord page by clicking here.

 

 
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