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Posts Tagged ‘Aviva Lifetime Lump Sum Scheme’

Can Equity Release Schemes Prevent you Becoming an ‘Interest Only Mortgage Prisoner’?

Sunday, December 22nd, 2013

Can equity release schemes help unlock interest only mortgage prisoners?It seemed such a sensible thing to do at the time. Perhaps you were just starting out on the property ladder or you wanted to move up market to afford that dream home and as a result your income was stretched?

 

Back then an interest only mortgage was a perfectly reasonable option for a few years until your earnings increased and then you could switch to a full repayment mortgage. Or perhaps, very sensibly, you set up a repayment vehicle such as an endowment plan or you relied on the anticipated growth of your pension fund to take care of the mortgage in the dim and distant future?

 

Reaching retirement with an interest only mortgage

Life never quite works out as expected and here you are, approaching or beyond retirement, with a mortgage still outstanding and with a mortgage lender demanding to know how you intend to repay. Either you never got around to switching to a repayment mortgage or, by reason of poor investment performance or poor advice, your repayment fund has fallen woefully short of target.

 

You are not alone! Earlier this year the Financial Conduct Authority report that that almost half of those borrowers with interest only mortgages, approximately 1.3 million people, may not be able to repay their mortgage. And the average shortfall is estimated to be £71,000.

 

Can the high street lenders help?

So how have high street mortgage lenders responded? Mainly by applying higher interest rates to existing interest only mortgages or by forcing borrowers into repayment plans, usually very short term for borrowers over 60, with little regard to affordability or even existing and adequate savings plans.

 

So how do you break free from this “mortgage prison”?

Firstly, you must consider your options for the future;-

  • If you have savings, do you want to use them to reduce the outstanding mortgage, bearing in mind that the cost of the mortgage will certainly outweigh any return you are making on your savings?
  • How much of your savings do you want to retain as a cash emergency fund?
  • Do you intend to move now or within the next few years and, if so, will this allow you to repay the mortgage, cover all the moving costs and leave sufficient finds to re-house yourselves?

 

Secondly, if these options are not available to you and you want to remain in the family home, then you could consider an equity release mortgage, preferably after eliminating all other possibilities and following consultation with your family.

 

How can equity release schemes help?

There are two types of equity release plans approved by the Equity Release Council and they come with the following written guarantees:

  • You can stay in your home for life or until you go permanently in to care. In the case of joint applicants, this is until the survivor dies or goes in to care.
  • The plans are portable to other acceptable properties if you want to move.
  • No further monthly interest payments to make, unless you elect to do so.
  • You will never leave a debt to anyone due to the inclusion of a ‘no negative equity guarantee’

 

The two types of equity release mortgages are

  1. Home Reversion Plans – where you sell a percentage share of your home in exchange for a cash lump sum or regular income.
  2. Lifetime Mortgage Schemes – where you release funds secured on your property with the option to either roll-up the interest with no monthly payments, or to pay monthly interest in full or part.

 

Case Study example

A couple aged 66 and 65 living in their home valued at £300,000 and desperately wanting to repay an interest only mortgage of £60,000. The maximum they could raise from a standard lifetime mortgage would be 29% of the property value, i.e. £87,000. They have options and the following are examples of mortgage products currently available:-

 

a)      They can choose to borrow £60,000 (plus more to cover fees) to repay the existing lender and have the interest rolled-up for life with no further monthly payments. The valuation fee could be free with some of the current equity release deals available. The other costs taken by lender, solicitor and adviser could amount to approximately £2,000 which could be deducted from the loan. The interest rate fixed for life on equity release plans such as the Aviva Lifetime Flexi could be as low as 5.62% (5.80% representative APR) and, in addition, they could have ready access to a cash reserve if they wanted to borrow more in the future.

 

b)      They can choose to borrow the £60,000 (plus more to cover fees) and pay the monthly interest for life or for a fixed number of years. Dependent upon income, the lifetime fixed rate could be fixed as low as 4.75% (5.10% representative APR) resulting in a maximum monthly interest payment of £238pm. However, if this is too much for their budget they could elect for alternative plans such as Stonehaven’s Interest Select range & opt to pay a lesser sum each month (minimum of £25). The remaining unpaid monthly interest would be rolled up and repaid at the end. The fees are approximately the same, but a valuation fee of £252 would be payable with the Stonehaven application form. Hence, we have interest only lifetime mortgage options to suit.

 

A new breed of lifetime mortgages

Recently, a new form of lifetime mortgage has been developed to help those looking for the maximum possible release. The enhanced lifetime mortgage, or ‘ill-health equity release plan’ has been developed with the maximum release in mind.

 

Although the maximum equity release isn’t suitable for everyone, it has its place for those who desperately want as much as they can release for either health reasons or a ‘needs must’ basis.

 

They differentiate from standard lifetime mortgage schemes by assessing someone’s medical history. Essentially, the worse one’s health has been, the greater the potential release. These plans are underwritten & are offered by actuarially based companies with experience in the field of pension annuities where similar principles are employed.

 

Therefore, an enhancement can make the difference between be able to repay that interest only mortgage, or not, so enhanced lifetime mortgages should always be considered with your adviser.

 

Summary

Equity release is a sensible option to escape becoming a “mortgage prisoner” but expert advice from a qualified equity release adviser is always essential. Explore the alternatives first and discuss matters with your family to obtain a second opinion.

 

If you would like a free initial consultation to assess your interest only mortgage options, please contact Mike Vicary of Equity Release Supermarket, on 07795 195302.

 

Mike has successfully helped people make the interest only remortgage transition, thus enabling retirees to remain in their home & avoid becoming an ‘interest only mortgage prisoner’.

 

Equity Release Schemes – Do The Sums Actually Add Up?

Wednesday, February 16th, 2011

The main concern of equity release schemes is the reduced inheritance which is passed down to beneficiaries. Here we discuss the pro’s & con’s of roll-up equity release plans.

 

First, let’s look at the effect on the beneficiaries & the source of the causes for concern. This then leads us to the equity release calculator with facts & figures showing how these schemes fair for the beneficiaries on final redemption of the plan.

 

Ok, we’ve have all heard the saying; bad news travels faster than good news & this is synonymous with terminology ‘equity release’.

Although equity release plans were initiated in 1965, the news damaging these schemes generally dates back to the late 1980’s when the first home income plans were launched.

Linked to an annuities or regular income investment bonds & an interest only mortgage, plans such as these were destined to fail, relying heavily on investment performance in a period of falling property values & rapidly rising interest rates.

 

The mid 90’s then introduced the much derided & chastened Shared Appreciation Mortgages (SAM’s), the focus of most causes for campaigns against equity release including Trevor MacDonald’s Tonight TV programme.

Therefore, its no wonder the industries reputation was soured.

 

So what has the equity release industry done about repairing this negative sentiment?

At the time of the SAM’s debacle, SHIP (Safe Home Income Plans) was launched. Formed from its originators – Ecclesiastical Life, Hodge Equity Release, Home & Capital Trust & GE Life all members agreed to abide by a strict code of conduct, which still exists today.

Soon new lenders entered the equity release market, with household names such as Norwich Union & Northern Rock with their newly developed roll-up equity release schemes bringing a significant boost & trust to the industry.

Although equity release schemes began to blossom around 2003 with approximately 25,000 equity release loans completed, a lack of regulation still overshadowed the equity release sector. The market was still somewhat bighted by the previous misdemeanours.

 

Thankfully, partial regulation was soon imposed on the equity release industry with lifetime mortgages coming under the auspices of the Financial Services Authority on 31st October 2004. Home reversions soon joined lifetime mortgage schemes & by 2007 full regulation & confidence was brought back to the equity release marketplace.

Therefore, the market has evolved & strived to restore pride; a far cry from the negative perceptions of decades ago.

 

So what does this all mean for today’s beneficiaries?

The main ‘clean up act’ came with the introduction of SHIP & its rules imposed on the members. The ‘no negative equity guarantee’ affords the greatest level of protection the industry has to offer.

Safe in the knowledge that any amount borrowed by their parents can never escalate to more than the eventual sale price of the property, they are at least guaranteed no debt can be passed onto themselves.

A crumb of comfort maybe, but certainly peace of mind for parents.

 

As an equity release adviser, encouragement must always be shown to involve the heirs to the estate. With their input & assurance, feelings can then be vented either for or against equity release being taken as for many this is a major financial proposition.

Again qualified advisers should play an important role in explaining the pro’s & con’s of equity release mortgages & convey these issues to all parties concerned.

 

What else does the equity release sector afford by way of protection?

Interest rates for home equity release schemes, albeit not the lowest ever, are still historically low. One positive feature of these schemes is the lifetime fixed rate on all equity release loans now.

 

So what is the benefit of this?

If you borrowed an amount of capital, with a fixed interest rate for life it enables you to calculate the exact future balance.

This is building further reassurance for potential equity release applicants.

We know the equity release balance escalates over the lifetime of the scheme; this is the nature of plans & should never be entered into unless this has been clearly explained. The effect of the interest compounding annually, approximately doubles the balance every 10-11 years, depending on interest rate charged by the equity release companies.

 

Sounds daunting? Well, let’s now look at the sums as promised earlier:

One of the lowest interest rates around at present would be the Aviva Lifetime Lump Sum scheme, which  currently has a fixed interest rate of 6.65% (6.9% APR) annual.

 

A male, aged 65 borrowing a lump sum of £25,000 on the 6.65% Aviva Lifestyle lump sum would know exactly what the future balance will be, even before taking out the equity release scheme. The Key Facts Illustration provided by the equity release adviser will confirm these figures & also the costs & additional features involved.

For instance, based on a release of £25,000 in this scenario would lead to a balance in 10 years of £47,594 & after 20 years would be £90,606.

This may seem expensive given only £25,000 was borrowed initially; however there are two factors that could still rule in the equity releases favour.
One common issue overlooked is the potential for property prices to increase. If so, & with 100% ownership of the house still retained the homeowner will fully benefit from any future escalation in the house price. This will then offset some of the compounding effect of the interest & mitigate its effect on the overall estate. Again, we are looking longer term & no guarantee can be given prices will go up; nevertheless historical data confirms they still have.

As a consequence, a rule of thumb is never to borrow anymore than required beyond the initial 12 months. Plans are now flexible enough with drawdown schemes being available that funds can even be drip fed over time as & when required.

Hence, by taking a lower initial amount would result in less interest being charged, meaning more inheritance passed to the beneficiaries.

 

 

The second factor affecting the balance accruing & is the main cause of equity release roll-up is purely down the fact that NO monthly payments are required. This helps retirees to have access to the equity tied up in their property & at the same time leave their budget unaffected.

Nevertheless, equity release schemes do have an increasing role in retirement planning for the over 55’s. Care must always be taken & never rushed into without discussion & involvement of third parties.

Advice should always be provided by an industry qualified equity release consultant. If so, & in the right circumstances equity release can provide a comfortable & enjoyable retirement.

 

Finally, hopefully lessons have been learned from the past & the industry can move forward, innovate & develop further over time.

 

To discuss any of these issues & with no obligation whatsoever, please contact the Equity Release Supermarket team on 0800 678 5159 or email mark@equityrelease supermarket.co.uk

 

 
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